How To Build A Gaming PC: Step-By-Step Guide For 2020

The PC is the most powerful gaming platform out there. A strong gaming computer has the potential for higher resolutions, faster frame rates, and better visuals than current consoles can even come close to achieving. It can be very tempting to build your own gaming PC, but if you don’t know where to start, it can also be quite intimidating and turn you off entirely. Thankfully, it doesn’t have to be that way. PCs are much easier to build than they were in the past, and while it’s not as easy as putting together a Lego spaceship, you don’t have to be scared of it.

That’s why we’ve put together this straightforward guide on how to build a gaming PC. It’s intended for those who are a little wary of building their first PC or just need a little refresher of the steps to doing so. We’ll cover everything from the prep phase and picking parts to the actual parts like the CPU, GPU, motherboard, CPU cooler, hard drive (and yes, of course, which SSD you should throw in there) build and beyond. Of course, due to the current pandemic, many online stores are experiencing product shortages and shipping delays that could interfere with your PC build, so be sure to check the estimated delivery date when ordering from stores like Newegg or Amazon.

Actually picking your parts can be daunting, especially when you factor in compatibility and power consumption. There are a lot of things to consider, partially because many of your components may rely on your CPU being either from Intel or AMD. Thankfully, PC Part Picker is an invaluable resource that you should absolutely refer to when building a PC. We used the website to build our rig and highly recommend using it for yours. It makes it easy to stay within your budget and lets you know if your components are compatible with each other–it’ll even make suggestions if there are issues with your chosen parts.

If you’re looking for some accessories to round out your new gaming rig, check out the best gaming mice, best gaming headset, best capture card for streaming, best gaming keyboard, and best budget gaming monitors.

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Fortunately, you don’t need many tools or extra parts to build your PC–almost everything you need will be included in your components’ boxes. However, there are a few items you’ll need to have ready before you start building your PC.

Screwdrivers:

For the vast majority of your build, you’ll be using a No. 2 Phillips screwdriver, but if you’re installing M.2 SSDs into your motherboard, then you’ll want to use a smaller No. 1 Phillips screwdriver for that.

Flashlight:

Thankfully, nearly every smartphone on the market can be used as a flashlight, and you’ll likely need it when installing certain cables and components into your case.

Thermal paste:

You’ll want a tube of thermal paste to keep your CPU’s temperature low during use. Most CPU coolers come with thermal paste already applied, which means you won’t need any extra. However, if you do end up buying a tube of thermal paste, you can clean the cooler’s paste off and use your own.

Terms to know

We’ve attempted to simplify the process of building a gaming PC as much as possible here, but if you’re not familiar with PC hardware, some of the terms in this guide may need some clarification. We’ve briefly explained some of the parts and terminology we’ll be using below. Feel free to reference this section as you work on your build.

GPU: GPU stands for graphics processing unit; another name for a graphics card. This will handle displaying images on your PC. The more elaborate and complex these images are, the more power you’ll need from your graphics card. The two big names in the graphics card game are Nvidia and AMD.

CPU: The CPU (central processing unit, also known as a processor) handles all of the processes and calculations on your PC. For your PC, you’ll choose a CPU from either Intel or AMD.

Motherboard: The motherboard is where all of the components are installed, allowing them to work together and perform their functions properly.

SATA: SATA is a type of connection, like USB, that is used for hard drives and SSDs to transfer data

PCIe: PCIe is another type of connection, though it’s most commonly used for graphics cards and M.2 SSDs

NVMe: NVMe is a type of connection protocol that can be supported by M.2 SSDs. This provides much faster access to saving and accessing data.

M.2 SSD: An M.2 SSD is a small stick that provides your PC with storage space. You can get a SATA-based M.2 SSD or a PCIe-based M.2 SSD, the latter of which can support NVMe.

RAM: The RAM (or random access memory) is used to store data and information that is being processed by the CPU. The more RAM you have–paired with a good-quality processor–the faster your PC can perform its various functions.

Cooling system: The cooling system is used to protect the CPU from overheating.

PSU: The PSU (or power supply) supplies your PC and its various components with power.

OS: OS stands for operating system. Most gaming PCs will utilize Windows 10–it’s what we suggest–though some people may want to install Linux.

A look at some gaming PC builds

We’ve included a breakdown of our recommended PC build alongside a much more affordable gaming PC build. This should give you an idea of the vast price range you can expect when starting to build your first PC. More expensive PC builds will absolutely rock your bank account, but they’re more likely to be future-proofed–you won’t need to upgrade the PC’s components for quite some time, and when you do, you likely won’t need to upgrade more than your graphics card. The cheaper PCs can still provide an excellent experience at a much more affordable price, but you may need to upgrade it more often if you want to keep up with new releases. Either way, you’re sure to have a fantastic gaming experience, as long as you keep your expectations in check with your budget. Keep in mind that many a PC build these days lacks an optical drive (since actual disk usage is rare nowadays), but you always add one later if you need one.

Our gaming PC build

Exact price: $2,862

$1,000 gaming PC build

Exact price: $997

How to build a gaming PC

Step 1: Prepare your motherboard

Parts used: Motherboard

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Assembling the motherboard outside of the case will make your whole experience much easier to deal with. Our general rule of thumb is to install as many parts as possible before screwing it into your case. An important thing to note before starting on your motherboard is that you should refer to its manual as often as possible, as your specific motherboard may suggest specific ways or places to install your components. Also, keep in mind that certain parts will require some force when plugging them in, while others simply just need to be placed into their respective spots. Please pay close attention to the following instructions before installing your components.

The first thing you’ll want to do is make sure you’re assembling your PC on a flat surface. Don’t build it on a carpet–the mixture of static electricity and your PC’s parts is a dangerous combination and could cause damage to your components. It’s unlikely to happen, but we still suggest touching your metal case from time to time to help ground yourself and avoid this from happening.

Instead, build your rig in a room with hardwood or laminate floors like a dining room or kitchen–we even went the extra mile and took our socks off. Take your motherboard out of its packaging and then place it on a flat surface. You can lay it directly on your table, but we personally placed it on top of its box to avoid scratching our desk. At this point, you’re ready to start.

Step 2: Install the CPU

Parts used: CPU, motherboard

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The easiest part of your entire build is also the first: installing our AMD Ryzen CPU. Your motherboard’s CPU socket will be protected by a piece of plastic, which you’ll be able to remove when you open the tray. All you need to do is gently push down on the tray’s metal arm and pull it out. Once it’s free of the tray, lift it up to open the socket and the protective plastic will fall out. Be sure to keep this plastic piece in case of any issues with your motherboard, as you’ll need to reinsert it before sending it back to the manufacturer.

At this point, your CPU socket tray should be open, allowing you to install your CPU on to your motherboard. Your CPU should have some small half-circle indents in its board. The CPU socket is designed to fill these indents, making it easy to line up your CPU and install it properly. Once you’ve figured out how to place your CPU into its socket, do so gently. Do not apply pressure directly on the CPU–simply close the tray and make sure the metal arm is locked into its original position, which may require a bit of force.

Step 3: Install M.2 SSD(s)

Parts used: M.2 SSD(s), motherboard

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M.2 SSDs are another easy step in the process, but don’t forget to reference your manual to find out which M.2 slots you should use first. Your motherboard may have protective thermal guards on your M.2 slots, so remove those first. Once you’ve taken any guards off the motherboard, you can slot in your M.2 SSDs. These require a little bit of force to slot into their respective slots, but don’t push too hard–they should slide in quite easily. Once the M.2 SSDs are in their slots, the opposite end should be pointing upward at a diagonal angle. At this point, you take the respective screw (that is often included with your motherboard), push each M.2 SSD down, and screw them into the appropriate spots. At this point, you can take the thermal guard and place it on top of each M.2 SSD, screwing it back into place.

Step 4: Install the RAM

Parts used: RAM, motherboard

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This is another step where you’ll want to reference your motherboard’s manual, which should be able to tell you which order to place the RAM in. If you have four slots and only two sticks of RAM, then you should make sure the two sticks are spaced apart in either the first and third slot or second and fourth–your motherboard manual can advise you here. Placing your RAM apart like this will help you get the most out of your CPU. First off, be sure to flip down the plastic clips on both sides of each slot you plan on using. Inserting the RAM requires more force, but make sure you start small and then ramp up your pressure gradually. When you hear a click, your RAM is in its slot. This should cause the plastic clips to flip up, gripping your RAM. If you notice your clips haven’t flipped up, then your RAM may not be seated properly.

Step 5: Get your case ready for your motherboard

Parts used: Case

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It’s almost time to throw your motherboard into your case, but first you’ll need to screw in some standoff screws that you’ll place your motherboard onto before screwing it in. These standoffs will come with your motherboard, and once you’ve located them, you can start screwing them into your case. There should be about a dozen holes for the standoffs to fit into. Refer to your case’s manual if you’re having trouble finding them. Once the standoffs are screwed in, you’re ready to insert your motherboard.

Step 6: Install your motherboard into your case

Parts used: Motherboard, case

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The standoffs make it easy to place your motherboard into your case, but don’t start screwing it in straight away. There should be a space on the back of your case for your motherboard’s I/O ports to fit into. It’ll be a rectangle, and you’ll want your motherboard to be inserted comfortably into this space so that you can access all of the ports. Once everything fits, you can start screwing your motherboard onto the standoffs with the appropriate screws. Don’t forget that you don’t want to screw anything too tightly. Just turn your screwdriver until everything is securely tightened, and then you’re ready to move on.

Step 7: Install your power supply (PSU)

Parts used: Power supply, case, motherboard

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Installing the power supply into your case is often quite easy. You’ll want to refer to your specific case’s manual for this, but it’s pretty straightforward. First, we took our case’s mounting bracket and screwed it onto the back of our power supply. You’ll notice your power supply also sports a fan, which is used to circulate air. If you’re planning on placing your finished gaming PC on a hardwood floor or desk, then feel free to aim this fan downward; if you’re placing your gaming PC on a carpeted floor, then you’ll want to aim the fan upward.

Once you’ve figured out which way your PSU needs to be oriented, and screwed on the mounting bracket, you can easily slide it into your case and tighten the bracket’s screws. Depending on how much room you have for your PSU, you may want to hold off on screwing it in until you’ve plugged in all of its various power cables.

Step 8: Connect any SATA hard drives/SSDs

Parts used: SATA drives, case, power supply

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Now that the power supply is installed, you can start connecting any SATA hard drives or SSDs. Your case should have a specific bay area dedicated to holding these kinds of drives. Locate this area, then look for two metal clasps on the left and right side of each bay. Squeeze these clasps and then pull the bay out. Here is where you’ll be able to screw in your SATA drive and keep it stable inside your case. Once this is done, you’ll want to reinsert the bay into its place, and then plug a SATA and PSU cable into your hard drive. Find the SATA slot on your motherboard and plug the other side of the appropriate cable into it, then plug the other side of the PSU cable into your power supply. Your drive is now installed, though you will need to format it once your PC is up and running.

Step 9: Plug your case and power cables into the motherboard

Parts used: Case, power supply, motherboard

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Now, you’re ready to start plugging cables into your motherboard. This part requires some patience, as your case cables are extremely tiny and can be difficult to orient. You’ll want to reference both your case and motherboard manuals during this step. Some motherboards, like our Aorus Ultra, come with a bus that you can plug the case cables into before inserting them into the motherboard. This makes this step much easier.

Your case cables make it so you can use the various ports on the front of your PC in addition to the power button itself. Of course, nothing is going to happen when you press that button if you don’t plug your PSU into your motherboard. You’ll want to plug the 24-pin ATX and EPS12V cables into their respective spots on both the motherboard and PSU. You’ll be plugging in all of your power cables into the PSU, including fans, SATA drives, and your cooling system.

Step 10: Install your CPU cooling system

Parts used: Cooling system, CPU, motherboard

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Installing your cooling system can be a somewhat nerve-wracking experience, particularly when applying the thermal paste, but it’s a lot easier than it sounds. The first thing you need to do is mount the system’s bracket to the motherboard. You’ll need access to the back of the motherboard tray, as you’ll be screwing part of it to the back of the tray. This’ll give you the spots you need to set the cooler’s pump onto your CPU and motherboard. Before you do this, however, there are a few other steps.

Liquid-based CPU cooling systems come with a radiator equipped with fans, which you’ll want to screw into your case. Of course, you’ll need to figure out where you want to install it. We recommend screwing it into your case’s top grill, as it’ll allow for more airflow, but some cases may not have a top grill, and you’ll need to install it on the back of the case. Once you figure out what position you’re going to go with, you’ll screw the radiator into the grill itself. Once you’re done this, you’re ready to attach the pump.

First, you’ll want to apply some thermal paste. Some coolers come with thermal paste already applied; if that’s the case, your cooler’s thermal paste is most likely capable of handling the job, and you may be able to skip this next step. You can also easily remove the cooler’s paste with a dry cloth if you bought thermal paste you’d rather go with. You’ll want to apply a pea-sized glob of thermal paste into the center of your CPU. During this step, always go smaller than bigger. Once applied, you can press the cooler into its position on the CPU and thermal paste. If you feel like you’ve accidentally applied too much thermal paste, don’t worry: It’s as easy as wiping the CPU off with a dry cloth and rubbing alcohol and trying again.

Once the pump is installed, you’ll want to make sure all of your cooling system’s wires are plugged into the right spots. Our particular cooler required us to plug a micro-USB cable into our pump and the other side into our motherboard.

Step 11: Start cable management

Parts used: Case

Before we move on to the last step of physically building your PC, you may want to do some cable management to clean up. This’ll create some room for air circulation and accessing your components if you ever want to upgrade later. Most cases come with Velcro straps or zip ties, but I always keep a bag of Velcros on hand just in case. The case we went with, Fractal’s Meshify C, includes an awesome area for cable management that’s equipped with a series of Velcro straps. It’s located on the back of the motherboard tray. We were able to slide all of our cables into this space and keep it all fastened up nicely.

The only zip ties we used were for our CPU cooling system’s wires, which were thin and plentiful. This made it easier for us to orient them through the holes in our case to reach our desired spot. Just make sure you don’t over-tighten your zip ties as doing so could damage your cables.

Step 12: Install your graphics card

Parts used: Graphics card, motherboard

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Finally, it’s time to discuss the component you’re probably the most excited about. The graphics card is easy to install. First, you’ll need to remove an appropriate number of expansion slot inserts from the back of your case to fit your graphics card. This will vary depending on which GPU you go with, but two is usually the safe number–our MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti takes up two. Once you unscrew and remove them, figure out which PCIe Express slot you’ll need to insert your card into, then flip its plastic notch at the far end of the slot downward to prepare for installation. At this point, all you need to do is line up the graphics card with the PCIe Express slot and then push down until the plastic notch flips up and clicks. Again, you don’t need a lot of force to push it in, but you will need to push the graphics card into its slot until you get that click. Once you hear that, you can screw your graphics card’s mounting brackets into the case using the expansion slot’s screws and holes.

At this point, you need to plug your graphics card into your power supply to give it power. (Low-end graphics cards don’t typically require extra power, so if that’s what you’re working with, you’re good to skip this step.) Take the appropriate cables included with your power supply and plug one end into the graphics card; then, plug the other into the PSU. It’s okay if there are parts of the cables that go unused–just make sure every port on the graphics card has part of the cable plugged in.

Step 13: Install your OS

Parts used: USB thumb drive, case

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Once you’ve ensured a tidy PC with all of your cables managed, you should connect an HDMI cable to your PC and plug the other end into a monitor. Plug the power cable into your PSU and the other end into an outlet; then, flip the power switch on the back of your PC to its “On” position. Press the power button on your PC, and if it turns on, you’re almost good to go.

At this point, you’ll need another PC and a fast USB drive of at least 8GB–we suggest the SanDisk Extreme Pro. You’ll then want to head over to Microsoft and follow the steps provided there. This will help you create an installation device out of your USB drive, which you can plug into your PC before booting it up. Upon starting your PC, it should go straight into the Windows 10 installation process. Follow the steps here and wait for it to install. Once you’re done, you should be good to go, though you will need to buy a proper license for Windows 10 from Microsoft. If you do this from your new PC, it’ll activate automatically. On this is all setup, you’re good to go, barring the installation of an optical drive, if you chose to get one.

If your PC doesn’t turn on

If your PC doesn’t boot, don’t worry: It’s certainly not the end of the world. There are a number of things that can cause a PC to not boot up on your first try, and save for any product malfunctions, they’re easily solvable. Here are a few things you can do to troubleshoot your powerless PC.

Is the power supply plugged into an outlet?

This is a simple fix. Just plug your PC into an outlet, and you should be good to go.

Is the power supply’s switch turned on?

Make sure you’ve flipped your PSU’s switch into the ‘On’ position before powering on. This is an easily overlooked issue with a solution that’s just as easy.

Are your power supply cables seated in the motherboard properly?

This is the next thing you should double-check. Reconnecting the cables could be what you need to finally deliver power to your PC.

Are your case’s cables plugged into your motherboard properly?

It’s important to get this step right because if you push your case’s power button and its specific cable isn’t plugged in correctly, it won’t be able to start your PC. Some motherboards come with a serial bus that you can plug your case’s cables into before connecting to your motherboard.

Are your parts installed correctly?

This is the last thing to check as it can be the most time-consuming. Reconnecting your RAM and CPU or simply switching the RAM sticks into different slots could be the solution you’re looking for.

If all this fails, then your components may be defective.

Unfortunately, this can happen. Sometimes when building a PC, you realize that one of your components isn’t working correctly. At this point, you’ll need to contact the manufacturer of your part and ask them about their return policy. The vast majority of big PC component manufacturers have return policies that will cover defective parts, so you don’t have to worry. It just might take a little longer to enjoy your brand-new gaming computer.

US Cyber Command says foreign hackers will most likely exploit new PAN-OS security bug

US Cyber Command

US Cyber Command said today that foreign state-sponsored hacking groups are likely to exploit a major security bug disclosed today in PAN-OS, the operating system running on firewalls and enterprise VPN appliances from Palo Alto Networks.

“Please patch all devices affected by CVE-2020-2021 immediately, especially if SAML is in use,” US Cyber Command said in a tweet today.

“Foreign APTs will likely attempt [to] exploit soon,” the agency added, referring to APT (advanced persistent threat), a term used by the cyber-security industry to describe nation-state hacker groups.

CVE-2020-2021 – a rare 10/10 vulnerability

US Cyber Command officials are right to be panicked. The CVE-2020-2021 vulnerability is one of those rare security bugs that received a 10 out of 10 score on the CVSSv3 severity scale.

A 10/10 CVSSv3 score means the vulnerability is both easy to exploit as it doesn’t require advanced technical skills, and it’s remotely exploitable via the internet, without requiring attackers to gain an initial foothold on the attacked device.

In technical terms, the vulnerability is an authentication bypass that allows threat actors to access the device without needing to provide valid credentials.

Once exploited, the bug allows hackers to change PAN-OS settings and features. While changing OS features seems innocuous, and of little consequence, the bug is actually quite a major issue because it could be used to disable firewalls or VPN access-control policies, effectively disabling the entire PAN-OS devices.

PAN-OS devices must be in a certain configuration

In a security advisory published today, Palo Alto Networks (PAN) said that mitigating factors include the fact that PAN-OS devices must be in a certain configuration for the bug to be exploitable.

PAN engineers said the bug is only exploitable if the ‘Validate Identity Provider Certificate’ option is disabled and if SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language) is enabled.

pan-os-checks.png

Devices that support these two options — and are vulnerable to attacks — include systems like:

  • GlobalProtect Gateway
  • GlobalProtect Portal
  • GlobalProtect Clientless VPN
  • Authentication and Captive Portal
  • PAN-OS next-generation firewalls (PA-Series, VM-Series) and Panorama web interfaces
  • Prisma Access systems

These two settings are not in the vulnerable positions by default and require manual user intervention to be set in that specific configuration — meaning that not all PAN-OS devices are vulnerable to attacks by default.

Some devices have been configured to be vulnerable

However, according to Will Dormann, vulnerability analyst for CERT/CC, several vendor manuals instruct PAN-OS owners to set up this exact particular configuration when using third-party identity providers — such as using Duo authentication on PAN-OS devices, or third-party authentication solutions from Centrify, Trusona, or Okta.

This means that while the vulnerability looks harmless at a first glance due to the complex configuration needed to be exploitable, there are likely quite a few devices configured in this vulnerable state, especially due to the widespread use of Duo authentication in the enterprise and government sector.

As a result, owners of PAN-OS devices are advised to immediately review device configurations and apply the latest patches provided by Palo Alto Networks if their devices are running in a vulnerable state.

The list of vulnerable PAN-OS releases where CVE-2020-2021 is known to work are listed below.

pan-os-affected.png

Following Palo Alto’s vulnerability disclosure today, several respected figures in the cyber-security community have echoed the US Cyber Command warning and have also urged system administrators to patch PAN-OS devices as soon as possible, also anticipating attacks from nation-state threat actors to follow in a matter of days.

Palo Alto Networks did not return an email seeking comment on the US Cyber Command’s warning.

Philly judge creates program to help small businesses reopen and negotiate with creditors

“A business owner would file a petition for an injunction. That injunction would stay any debt collections, or rent and mortgage payments while we sort out the issues,” he said. “We’re still dealing with set-up questions. Will we involve law schools? Will the parties be represented? It involves the appointment of a monitor, to contact the creditors and then mediate between business owners and collectors.”

Quick Compare Of 2020 Tesla Model Y Vs. Model 3 — Beginner’s Buying Guide To Two Hot Electric Cars

Buying an electric car can be a daunting decision for first-time buyers.

Here’s a very short, very basic comparison of the Model 3 and Model Y for electric car buyers just getting their feet wet:

Type:

—Model Y: SUV*

—Model 3: sedan

*Also called a CUV or crossover utility vehicle

Production start date:

—Model Y: January 2020

—Model 3: mid-2017

American made:

Both the Model 3 and Model Y are made in America in Fremont, Calif.

How similar?

The Model Y is based on the Model 3 and shares 75% of the parts, according to Tesla. And to the untrained eye, they can be hard to distinguish.

How different?

But there are some big differences like cargo space and ground clearance — the Model Y has more of both. And you sit higher in the Model Y because the Y’s seats are on risers, which makes it easier to get in and get out of the car compared to the Model 3.

The Model Y also uses a more efficient heat pump versus the resistive heating system in the Model 3.

And the Model Y is taller, wider, and longer than the Model 3. It’s only a matter of inches (e.g., the Y is about 7 inches taller) but it can make a difference for things like headroom.

How popular?

The Model 3 was the best-selling car in California — the hottest electric car market in the U.S. — in the first quarter of 2020, beating both the Honda Civic and Toyota Camry, according to the California New Car Dealers Association. Since the Model Y is just beginning to ramp up production, the jury is still out but CEO Elon Musk has said that he expects it to outsell the Model 3.

Price:

2020 Tesla Model Y Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive Long Range: base price: $52,990 (cheapest version currently available / price as shown on Tesla’s website)

2020 Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus base price: $37,990 (cheapest model)

Battery range:

—Model Y (listed above): 316 miles (EPA estimate)

—Model 3 (listed above): 250 miles

Cargo space:

—Model Y: 68 cu ft*

—Model 3: 15 cu ft

*Here’s what Motor Trend says, however: “The Model Y can hold more stuff than the Model 3. However, the Model 3 with rear seats has almost comparable cargo capacity, not as bad as those numbers from the owner’s manuals suggest.”

That said, the Model Y’s frunk (front trunk) is deeper than the Model 3’s.

Seating capacity:

5 passengers for both the Model 3 and Model Y, though the Y has an option for seven passengers (see “options” below).

Ground clearance (think: light off-roading):

—Model Y: 6.6 inches

—Model 3: 5.5 inches

Basic warranty:

4 years / 50,000 miles for both the Model 3 and Model Y.

Major options:

—Model Y will offer a third row of seats, allowing it to seat seven passengers ($3,000 option)

—The Model 3 Performance offers 0-60 in 3.2 seconds for thousands of dollars less than the Model Y Performance (which is a plodding 3.5 seconds by comparison).

Windows 10: 2019 User Manual FREE Kindle Ebook

https://www.amazon.in/Windows-10-Manual-Learn-E…
Windows 10

2019 User Manual . Learn Everything You Need to Know About Windows 10

Do you like to use Windows 10?
Windows 10 is a system that you either love or hate. Some of us truly love the Windows 10 system, while for others, it took some serious getting used to. For others as well, it actually is hard for them to get into it because they never got into an OS before, and with all of the features, it can be exhausting to understand. But, luckily there is a book here that can help you, and this is it.
With this book, we’ll take your concerns about Windows 10, and help you sort through them. It is complicated, yes, but it’s not impossible. In fact, it’s much easier than you think. From storing data to the start menu, you’ll be a Windows 10 expert by the end of this, and that’s something that can truly help you.
We live in an age where you need to have some experience with technology. You’d be surprised at how much of a difference this makes when learning to understand this system. Windows 10 is one that can truly help you, and with this book, you’ll learn the basics.

This book will cover the following topics:
An introduction to Windows 10, what it is, and what you need to begin setup
The start menu and its functions
The desktop and some of the near features here
How to store data and the beauty of file explorer
How to manage programs and apps
How to effectively use the internet on this system
How to set up and maintain this system
How to play media on Windows 10
Troubleshooting the system
New features that have recently been installed on the Windows 10 system

By the end of this, with all of this put into place, you’ll be able to use Windows 10 to your advantage. By the end of this, with all of this implemented into place, you’ll be able to truly net what you want from this, create the Windows 10 system that you feel that you’ve deserved, and you’d be surprised at the difference that this makes as well. With Windows 10, there is a lot here that is offered, and you can truly net the benefits from this as well.  

James Weir: We need a rashie renaissance to combat all the weird bikinis

Usually this time of year allows a reprieve from hating our bodies because it’s too cold to strip down and, under the padding of a puffer jacket, what is out of sight is out of mind.

The only good thing about lockdowns is the cancellation of all international travel which means no more Instagram spam from bikini-clad people living it up in Positano and Mykonos while we slum it back home in the cold eating pasta.

Well, more fool me for thinking this would put a dampener on bikini content. Influencers refuse to be brought down by a pandemic or the cold. They work tirelessly to make us feel terrible about ourselves all year round. By hook or by crook, you better believe influencers will find a way to post a bikini pic no matter the situation.

Tammy Hembrow should receive an Order of Australia next year for her indefatigable services to racy bikini photos.

She posted a doozy this week showing off a rainbow string bikini along with the caption, “Focus on the good,” because Instagram spirituality goes hand-in-hand with racy bikini photos.

The internet went nuts the other day when Big Brother housemate Talia slinked out to the backyard wearing a racy red bikini that looked like something Borat might wear if he ever appeared in a Baywatch remake. The Borat mankini was the punchline of a joke for so long and now dames are killing to contort into one.

These swimsuits look like they should come with a user manual and a warning that they’re single-use only. Once you take it off, it probably tangles up in a knot like a pair of headphones.

The trend is starting to reach the general public. This week thousands of people flocked down to the beach in England’s Bournemouth after an easing of coronavirus restrictions. No one was more excited than this lady who couldn’t wait to show off her high-waisted string bikini. A high waisted bikini? Just wow. Controversial opinion: all guys reckon anything high-waisted looks weird.

There’s power in numbers and we need to band together to start the rashie renaissance. Rose Byrne was snapped over the summer rocking a rashie and Nicole Kidman was papped wearing a long-sleeve one-piece.

And remember Nigella Lawson’s beach burka? Okay, that one is a bit extreme. But let’s compromise – maybe we could get the best of both worlds with a thong-back beach burka.

Patent pending.

ESCAPING A HELL OF YOUR OWN MAKING

In yet another example of why it sucks to be Meghan Markle, it seems she can’t ditch a boring party without copping it.

A tell-all book from Lady Colin Campbell claims the royal family rift started just three days after the Sussex wedding at a garden party for Charles’ 70th birthday where Meghan told Harry she was bored and asked to leave after 15 minutes.

Of course Meghan was bored. Who wouldn’t be? She was hanging out in a backyard with a bunch of old people in kilts.

I have no doubt Camilla knows how to throw a rager, but you just know a group of conservative palace advisers would’ve hit the skids and took over the reins the moment she suggested getting a frozen daiquiri machine and a piñata that resembled Fergie. They would’ve ensured the party was a total downer.

Was it the moment a rift formed? Who knows. But that stuffy old party is certainly the exact moment Meghan realised what she had married into – a sobering lesson that royal life is not all it’s cracked up to be. She would’ve been trapped in a conversation with a bunch of decrepit British people sipping sherry and talking about hunting or plaid.

Of course Meghan wanted to get the hell out of there and hightail it back to her castle turret where she could kick back and watch Netflix.

It’s the worst when you’re stuck in a hell of your own making. I haven’t been trapped with any decrepit British people but I imagine it’s similar to the torture I endured when I had to see The Curious Case of Benjamin Button twice in one day because I lied to a date and said I hadn’t seen it yet. That three hour snoozefest makes a conversation about plaid seem like a rollercoaster ride.

Meghan’s not the only person getting bored and abandoning life.

Russell Crowe revealed this week his kids ditched him during the pandemic and pissed off to Sydney instead of hanging out on his farm.

Who knows what Rusty’s farmhouse looks like but there’s probably a lot of kerosene lamps and hunting for your own food.

He couldn’t believe they didn’t want to be stuck in the bush but, honestly, there’s only so many times you can tear around the paddock in dad’s old Gladiator chariot before it gets old.

Russell said he asked the kids why the hell they wanted to leave the bush and their answer was simple: Uber Eats.

I hope Meghan gave the same reason to the Queen when she crapped out of that party.

Twitter, Facebook, Instagram: @hellojamesweir

Quick Compare: 2020 Tesla Model Y Vs. Model 3 — Beginner’s Buying Guide To Two Hot Electric Cars

Buying an electric car can be a daunting decision for first-time buyers.

Here’s a very short, very basic comparison of the Model 3 and Model Y for electric car buyers just getting their feet wet:

Type:

—Model Y: SUV*

—Model 3: sedan

*Also called a CUV or crossover utility vehicle

Production start date:

—Model Y: January 2020

—Model 3: mid-2017

American made:

Both the Model 3 and Model Y are made in America in Fremont, Calif.

How similar?

The Model Y is based on the Model 3 and shares 75% of the parts, according to Tesla. And to the untrained eye, they can be hard to distinguish.

How different?

But there are some big differences like cargo space and ground clearance — the Model Y has more of both. And you sit higher in the Model Y because the Y’s seats are on risers, which makes it easier to get in and get out of the car compared to the Model 3.

The Model Y also uses a more efficient heat pump versus the resistive heating system in the Model 3.

And the Model Y is taller, wider, and longer than the Model 3. It’s only a matter of inches (e.g., the Y is about 7 inches taller) but it can make a difference for things like headroom.

How popular?

The Model 3 was the best-selling car in California — the hottest electric car market in the U.S. — in the first quarter of 2020, beating both the Honda Civic and Toyota Camry, according to the California New Car Dealers Association. Since the Model Y is just beginning to ramp up production, the jury is still out but CEO Elon Musk has said that he expects it to outsell the Model 3.

Price:

2020 Tesla Model Y Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive Long Range: base price: $52,990 (cheapest version currently available / price as shown on Tesla’s website)

2020 Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus base price: $37,990 (cheapest model)

Battery range:

—Model Y (listed above): 316 miles (EPA estimate)

—Model 3 (listed above): 250 miles

Cargo space:

—Model Y: 68 cu ft*

—Model 3: 15 cu ft

*Here’s what Motor Trend says, however: “The Model Y can hold more stuff than the Model 3. However, the Model 3 with rear seats has almost comparable cargo capacity, not as bad as those numbers from the owner’s manuals suggest.”

That said, the Model Y’s frunk (front trunk) is deeper than the Model 3’s.

Seating capacity:

5 passengers for both the Model 3 and Model Y, though the Y has an option for seven passengers (see “options” below).

Ground clearance (think: light off-roading):

—Model Y: 6.6 inches

—Model 3: 5.5 inches

Basic warranty:

4 years / 50,000 miles for both the Model 3 and Model Y.

Major options:

—Model Y will offer a third row of seats, allowing it to seat seven passengers ($3,000 option)

—The Model 3 Performance offers 0-60 in 3.2 seconds for thousands of dollars less than the Model Y Performance (which is a plodding 3.5 seconds by comparison).

How I made it: E-learning put Monica Murphy’s Monere Development Services on course

Monica Murphy’s life was transformed by a Commodore 64. Her father, a small farmer in Leitrim, brought the computer home when she was a child and she was hooked. “I’d sneak out of bed to read the MS-DOS manuals.”

She did her Leaving Cert in 1996 and, by her own admission, scraped into a computer science degree at Waterford Institute of Technology, hampered by having done ordinary-level maths.

What she lacked in algebra Murphy made up for in determination. “I struggled through the degree but I wanted it because of the freedom it represented. I always wanted to set up my own business.”

Her mother emphasised the importance of education while she inherited her work ethic from her father. “He’d have us out saving the

The Summer Triangle returns to the night sky

The constellations shown on modern star atlases are all officially approved by the International Astronomical Union, but while constellations are official, asterisms are not. An asterism is often defined as a noteworthy or striking pattern of stars within a constellation, but that is not always the case. The larger asterisms — ones like the Big Dipper in Ursa Major and the Great Square of Pegasus — are often better known than their host constellations.

In a few cases, we have asterisms which are composed from more than one constellation. One such example is now evident low in our east-northeast sky as darkness falls this week. It is, in fact, the easiest pattern to visualize because it’s composed of just three stars, but they are first-magnitude stars, and each is the brightest star in its own constellation. 

The star pattern in question is known as the “Summer Triangle.”

Related: Why do we call it the ‘Summer’ Triangle?

This graphic shows how the Summer Triangle arrangement of stars will appear at 9 pm ET on June 25, 2020 as seen from New York.  (Image credit: Starry Night Software.)

Looks can be deceiving

The brightest is the bluish-white star Vega, in the constellation Lyra, the lyre. Next in brightness is yellow-white Altair in Aquila, the eagle. Finally, there is white Deneb, in the constellation Cygnus, the swan. From our earthly viewpoint, Vega appears twice as bright as Altair and more than three times brighter than Deneb. But as the English idiom “don’t judge a book by its cover” cautions: sometimes things are not always what they seem to be. We know, for instance, that Vega clearly is more luminous compared to Altair, because it’s situated at a greater distance from us. Altair is 16.7 light-years away, while Vega is 25. Vega is 40 times more luminous than the sun, while Altair is only 11 times as lustrous.

But Vega actually pales in comparison with Deneb, one of the greatest supergiant stars known. Deneb’s distance measures 1,550 light-years from Earth with a luminosity recently computed to be an incredible 196,000 times that of our sun. 

If we could swap Vega’s placement relative to us with Deneb, Vega would be visible only with a moderately large telescope. But seen from Vega’s distance, Deneb would appear to shine about 100 times brighter than Venus; visible by day and casting distinct shadows at night. But because its light takes more than 15 centuries to reach us, Deneb merely appears as a fairly conspicuous but by no means particularly preeminent star. 

Moniker and branding issues

Some believe that the Summer Triangle would be better served being associated with the autumn season as opposed to summer. On the day of the autumnal equinox, the Triangle can be found directly overhead at dusk compared to where we see it now low in the east-northeast. The difference is that the Triangle is visible all night long from now through mid-August. While admittedly in an excellent position right after sunset by late September, at that time of the year the Triangle is dropping out of sight by around 3 a.m. local time. Hence, we associate it with balmy summer nights when it always is in view from dusk until dawn.

There has always been some debate as to who first christened the bright stellar trio of Vega, Deneb and Altair as the Summer Triangle. Some say that the legendary British astronomer Sir Patrick Moore, was the first to coin the term. In his book “Fireside Astronomy” (John Wiley & Sons, 1992) Moore wrote: “During a 1958 television broadcast on the BBC, I introduced the nickname of the Summer Triangle and everyone now seems to use the term, even though it is completely unofficial.” 

However, several years earlier, in 1952, in his very popular sky guide, “The Stars — A New Way to See Them,” Hans Augusto Rey (who was also the creator of the mischievous little monkey, Curious George), also used the Summer Triangle moniker. In addition, on page 54, Rey notes that: “Altair, Vega and Deneb form a huge right triangle, known to all navigators.” 

There could be some merit in Rey’s comment, since others believe that the term was popularized through U.S. navigator training manuals during World War II. Interestingly, Romanian astronomer Oswald Thomas (1882-1963) described Vega, Altair and Deneb as “Grosses Dreieck” (Great Triangle) in the late 1920s and “Sommerliches Dreieck” (Summerly Triangle) in 1934. 

Reappearance of the Milky Way 

The appearance of the Summer Triangle also signals the return of the summer Milky Way. During the spring, the Milky Way runs all around the horizon, hidden in low-lying haze. But now as the Summer Triangle gradually ascends the eastern sky in the coming days and weeks, we’ll begin to see one of the brightest sections of the Milky Way, cutting almost straight across the Triangle. 

Perhaps the most striking visual feature of all here is the great dark rift, which appears to split the galaxy in two with the Triangle. Beginning near Deneb in Cygnus and stretching its way through Aquila above Altair, this obscuring lane creates two parallel branches or streams of stars angling southwestward down the sky.

It is not, however, a region devoid of stars but a tremendous band of dust and other obscuring matter that lies between Earth and the center of our Milky Way galaxy. 

Our next “guest star?”

A final point concerning the Summer Triangle, of interest to visual and photographic observers: many naked-eye novas, or star explosions, have appeared in this part of the Milky Way in the past, and no doubt others will occur in the future. 

The last one to appear was in August 1975 in Cygnus, not far from Deneb and appearing nearly as bright. Also, as has frequently been pointed out by professional astronomers, we are long overdue for another supernova — a massive star near the end of its life that literally blows itself apart. The last to appear in our galaxy was Kepler’s Star in 1604; no doubt we are long overdue to see another. Such a cosmic spectacular might well burst in this part of the sky, bringing instant and certain fame to its discoverer.

Maybe tonight?

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers’ Almanac and other publications. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

PennDOT driver license and photo centers to close July 4

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) offices will close on July 4 in observance of Independence Day, according to a press release.

This closure will include the Riverfront Office Center in Harrisburg. Motor vehicle counter services at the Riverfront Office Center also will be closed July 3.

Customers may still obtain a variety of driver and vehicle products and services, including all forms, publications and driver training manuals, online through PennDOT’s Driver and Vehicle Services website, www.dmv.pa.gov.

Customers may continue to complete various transactions and access multiple resources online at www.dmv.pa.gov. Driver and vehicle online services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week and include driver’s license, photo ID and vehicle registration renewals; driver-history services; changes of address; driver license and vehicle registration restoration letters; ability to pay driver license or vehicle insurance restoration fee; driver license and photo ID duplicates; and driver exam scheduling. There are no additional fees for using online services.

Motorists can check conditions on major roadway by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, traffic speed information, and access to more than 950 traffic cameras.